Death Before Dishonor

T. R. Fehrenbach recently wrote an opinion piece for the San Antonio Express-News. Some of the ideas I felt were thought provoking, especially in light of our recent discussions:

[This] made me wonder about my own mother, when I took the shilling and voluntarily went to a new war. She didn’t like it, nor did my grandparents. Which I understood. But it was my decision; I was of age, and men untie the apron strings. We do it when we marry and when we go to war.

Had I been killed, I would have expected my mother to grieve. She grieved when one of her cats died. In fact, if no one grieved at my passing, my life would not have been worthwhile.

But if my mother had condemned my service and my dying, I would have felt that she dishonored me. I was not a child, her little boy. I did what men do, though women may weep. The way it’s always been, and probably always will be, world with or without end.

… Spartan mothers, it is said, told sons to return with their shields or upon them. In other words, death before dishonor.

Our culture does not allow us to say such things today. But the ethos still lives. Which is why we honor the valiant dead.

I cannot speak for others, but I would hope my mother would have done so had I not returned.

Probably best to keep this one away from your liberal friends:

[Read the Column Here]